Course Description

This course will cover topics relating to building worker voices in global supply chains, including:

  • Key elements of the current national and international global regulatory frameworks for global supply chains, and gaps and weaknesses in the existing frameworks
  • Modern slavery and human rights due diligence legislation (suggest more emphasis)
  • The impact of COVID-19 on decent work in global supply chains
  • Strategies for organising for decent work in global supply chains
  • The importance of worker and international organising in building workers say in global supply chains

Key Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • Identify key instruments and initiatives in the national and international global regulatory frameworks for global supply chains, including gaps and weaknesses
  • Identify and analyse strategies to build worker voices in global supply chains

Module 1: Regulating global supply chains

Module 1 will provide participants with an introduction to workers’ rights in global supply chains, including a discussion of the impact of COVID-19 on workers in global supply chains. This Module will give participants an overview of the global and national regulatory frameworks for global supply chains, including:

  • International Labour Organisation (ILO) Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE Declaration)
  • OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
  • UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights
  • National modern slavery and human rights due diligence laws

At the end of this module, participants should be able to:

  • Understand how global supply chains can increase labour exploitation, and particularly during economic crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • Identify the key global and national instruments and initiatives for regulating global supply chains;
  • Explain key concepts such as decent work and Human Rights Due Diligence (HRDD)

Module 2: Gaps and weaknesses of current regulation

Module 2 will explore the gaps and weaknesses of the current regulation at the national and international level, and discuss how we can strengthen existing regulation and campaign for new regulation. Organising to build workers ability to have influence is key to achieving decent work in global supply chains, and workers must be central to any strategy to ensure that human rights due diligence is effective, and not just another corporate social responsibility trend for businesses.

At the end of this module, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the gaps and weaknesses in the current international regulatory frameworks and in corporate social responsibility approaches
  • Outline the strengths and weaknesses of Australia’s Modern Slavery Act
  • Outline the international union movement agenda on achieving decent work in global supply chains
  • Recognise that strong worker voices are vital to achieving decent work in global supply chains

Module 3: Organising strategies to build worker power in global supply chains

Module 3 will provide participants with real examples of strategies to build workers influence in global supply chains. Participants will hear from union leaders and Global Union Federations (GUFs) about supply chain organising case studies that highlight the importance of global trade union solidarity in building global worker.

Case studies may include

  • Global framework agreements – eg. the garment industry – the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh (speaker from IndustriALL)
  • Call to Action in the Garment Industry calling on fashion brands to support manufacturers in COVID-19 pandemic (ITUC speaker)
  • Organising in Export Processing Zones
  • Organising service workers in global supply chains
  • Organising Amazon workers (an example of an e-commerce supply chain)

At the end of this module, participants should be able to:

  • Explain the concept of Global Framework Agreements, and how they can promote decent work in global supply chains
  • Identify and analyse strategies to build worker influence in global supply chains based on case studies
  • Recognise the crucial role of international solidarity in building workers influence in global supply chains

How does the course meet the objectives of the PET Fund Project?

Increasingly, Australian employees need to understand the role of international supply chains on productivity, and how productivity gains are an essential element to ongoing enterprise bargaining. This course will also help employee representatives to contribute to good leadership amongst workers up and down a supply chain.

Please ensure relevant approval has been granted by your union in accordance with its rules and elected official and note the cost of this course is $100.00 (GST inclusive).

Dates:

Friday 30 October – 1pm to 5pm AEDT

https://www.atui.org.au/ending-worker-exploitation-in-global-supply-chains